Ice, Ice, Baseball: National League Edition

I recently moved to Colorado and as a native Texan, it has been a struggle adjusting to the difference in temperature. Before I moved here, I had only seen snow maybe five times in my life. After seeing weather forecasts, it looks like that will change this winter. But it interested me in just how cold professional baseball games have been. I took a quick look at game time lows around professional baseball from the past five years. All information was gathered from box scores on Baseball-Reference.com and all temps are from home games including playoffs.

National League

Arizona Diamondbacks:

2016– 72 degrees, April 24th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2015– 70 degrees, May 8th against the San Diego Padres

2014– 64 degrees, April 3rd against the San Francisco Giants

2013– 70 degrees, April 10th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2012– 72 degrees, September 16th against the San Francisco Giants

Atlanta Braves:

2016– 55 degrees, April 10th against the St Louis Cardinals

2015– 61 degrees, October 2nd against the St Louis Cardinals

2014– 61 degrees, April 8th against the New York Mets

2013– 41 degrees, April 4th against the Philadelphia Phillies

2012-62 degree, April 18th against the New York Mets

Chicago Cubs:

2016-40 degrees, April 26th against the Milwaukee Brewers

2015– 39 degrees, April 29th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2014– 38 degrees, April 4th against the Philadelphia Philles

April 18th against the Cincinnati Reds

May 16th against the Milwaukee Brewers

2013– 38 degrees, April 13th against the San Francisco Giants

2012– 40 degrees, April 10th against the Milwaukee Brewers

Cincinnati Reds:

2016– 38 degrees, April 9th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2015– 55 degrees, October 1st against the Chicago Cubs

2014– 39 degrees, April 15th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2013– 46 degrees, April 19th against the Miami Marlins

2012– 46 degrees, April 11th against the St Louis Cardinals

Colorado Rockies:

2016– 43 degrees, April 26th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2015– 40 degrees, May 20th against the Philadelphia Phillies

2014– 48 degrees, April 4th against the Arizona Diamondbacks

April 7th against the Chicago White Sox

2013– 23 degrees, April 23rd against the Atlanta Braves

2012– 46 degrees, April 14th against the Arizona Diamondbacks

Los Angeles Dodgers:

2016– 61 degrees, April 25th against the Miami Marlins

April 27th against the Miami Marlins

2015– 57 degrees, April 7th against the San Diego Padres

2014– 63 degrees, April 22nd against the Philadelphia Phillies

April 25th against the Colorado Rockies

May 8th against the San Francisco Giants

2013– 60 degrees, April 15th against the San Diego Padres

2012– 54 degrees, April 13th against the San Diego Padres

Miami Marlins:

2016– 71 degrees, April 6th against the Detroit Tigers

April 16th against the Atlanta Braves

May 4th against the Arizona Diamondbacks

2015– 71 degrees, May 2nd against the Philadelphia Phillies

June 13th against the Colorado Rockies

2014– 72 degrees, August 2nd against the Cincinnati Reds

2013– 71 degrees, April 29th against the New York Mets

2012– 70 degrees, June 9th against the Tampa Bay Rays

Milwaukee Brewers:

2016– 63 degrees, April 8th against the Houston Astros

April 9th against the Houston Astros

2015– 62 degrees, April 21st against the Cincinnati Reds

2014– 62 degrees, April 14th against the St Louis Cardinals

April 15th against the St Louis Cardinals

2013– 60 degrees, May 26th against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2012– 59 degrees, May 12th against the Chicago Cubs

New York Mets:

2016– 41 degrees, April 9th against the Philadelphia Phillies

2015– 49 degrees, April 23rd against the Atlanta Braves

2014– 41 degrees, April 4th against the Cincinnati Reds

2013– 44 degrees, April 3rd against the San Diego Padres

2012– 49 degrees, April 23rd against the San Francisco Giants

Philadelphia Phillies:

2016-48 degrees, April 29th against the Cleveland Indians

2015-40 degrees, April 8th against the Boston Red Sox

2014– 46 degrees, April 29th against the New York Mets

2013– 50 degrees, April 21st against the St Louis Cardinals

50 degrees, April 22nd against the Pittsburgh Pirates

2012– 49 degrees, April 11th against the Miami Marlins

Pittsburgh Pirates:

2016– 39 degrees, April 3rd against the St Louis Cardinals

2015– 42 degrees, April 22nd against the Chicago Cubs

2014– 45 degrees, April 5th against the St Louis Cardinals

2013– 35 degrees, April 3rd against the Chicago Cubs

2012– 44 degrees, April 22nd against the St Louis Cardinals

San Diego Padres:

2016– 59 degrees, May 4th against the Colorado Rockies

May 5th against the San Diego Padres

2015– 60 degrees, May 14th against the Washington Nationals

2014– 60 degrees, April 2nd against the Los Angeles Dodgers

2013– 62 degrees, April 12th against the Colorado Rockies

April 14th against the Colorado Rockies

2012– 61 degrees, April 6th against the Los Angeles Dodgers

San Francisco Giants:

2016– 55 degrees, September 28th against the Colorado Rockies

2015– 54 degrees, April 17th against the Arizona Diamondbacks

2014-52 degrees, April 25th against the Cleveland Indians

2013– 54 degrees, June 18th against the San Diego Padres

2012-52 degrees, May 1st against the Miami Marlins

May 2nd against the Miami Marlins

St. Louis Cardinals:

2016– 50 degrees, April 11th against the Milwaukee Brewers

2015– 59 degrees, May 31st against the Los Angeles Dodgers

2014– 47 degrees, April 7th against the Cincinnati Reds

2013– 45 degrees, April 12th against the Milwaukee Brewers

2012– 49 degrees, April 13th against the Chicago Cubs

Washington Nationals:

2016– 43 degrees, April 10th against the Miami Marlins

2015– 46 degrees, April 8th against the New York Mets

2014– 49 degrees, April 17th against the St Louis Cardinals

2013– 45 degrees, April 3rd against the Miami Marlins

2012– 53 degrees, April 18th against the Houston Astros

 

Pulaski Profile Posts

A few people asked me why I didn’t post more stories this summer. Normally, I have time to write tons of player pieces and I did. I just didn’t have time to add them to the blog. I have attached links to the many Pulaski Yankees players I interviewed this summer. The future of the Yankees farm system is bright.

Wilkerman Garcia Shows Heart And Hustle

Second Time’s The Charm For Brandon Wagner

New York Native Tyler Honahan’s Dream Come True

Hector Rabago Builds A Better Defense

Blake Rutherford Learning The Ropes

Estevan Florial’s Baseball Family

Kevin Mahoney Builds Coaching Repertoire 

Manny Argomaniz’s Position Transition

Ben Ruta’s Staten Island Homecoming

Josh Gardiner’s Rocky Road Through Baseball

Icezack Flemming Embraces Unique Name

Phillip Diehl and Braden Bristo: Brothers In Arms

Kevin Cornelius Transitioning To Power Player

Truth, Justice, And The American Way

I’ve written about baseball teams made up of Lord of the Rings characters and the Avengers. I think it’s only fair that I look at the Justice League as well. After all what would DC think if they saw all the Marvel love. Here is today’s lineup:

The Justice League Lineup

  1. RF The Flash
  2. CF Superman
  3. SS Martian Manhunter
  4. C Batman
  5. 1B Wonder Woman
  6. 3B Green Arrow
  7. LF Green Lantern
  8. P Hawkman
  9. 2B Aquaman

Manager: Black Canary

Assistant Coach: The Atom

Officials: 1B umpire Joker

Home plate umpire Lex Luthor

So just how did I come to these conclusions? First off, the Flash is the fastest person ever. Why wouldn’t you have him batting first? By the time he even hits the ball, he could be all the way around the bases and scoring. And he can use his freaky fast powers to catch any ball in the outfield. He could be the center fielder if Superman and the Green Lantern couldn’t fly.

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(Courtesy GifSoup.com and Big Bang Theory)

Next we have Superman. He really is the team captain that sets the lineup and as such has deemed himself worthy of centerfield. It is fitting since he can fly and he’s already a huge baseball fan so I would trust his judgement.

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(Courtesy Twitter.com and Man Of Steel)

Batting third and playing shortstop is the Martian Manhunter. He’s not the fastest guy around but he’s a shapeshifter and  can stretch his limbs which makes him the ideal shortstop. He’s also telepathic and can sense when runners are going to steal bases.

In the cleanup spot is Batman. There’s not much to say about his spot in the order but he is also catching because of his ability to trash talk with the best of them. Just don’t tell him that he smells because he’s a little sensitive about that.

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(Courtesy DCUGuide.com and quickmeme.com)

Next is the first baseman or basewoman I should say because it’s Wonder Woman. She’s tall and strong and can catch pretty much whatever you throw at her. If a ball does happen to look like it’s going to get away from her, she can use her lasso of truth to stop it. And who knows? Maybe they train the Amazons in baseball in addition to the acrobatics and weapons training.

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(Courtesy giphy.com)

In the next two spots are the Green Team. Batting sixth and playing third base is the Green Arrow followed by the Green Lantern who is in left field. The Green Arrow has a strong arm due to shooting all of those arrows so no problem for him. The Green Lantern can fly and can move things with his mind. He has to be careful though because sometimes that could conflict with teammate Martian Manhunter.

Batting eighth is the pitcher, Hawkman. He has enhanced strength to the point where his pitches would be thrown extremely hard. He can also heal himself quickly which would allow him to pitch full games and on back-to-back days. In one issue, he almost severs his arm off but it heals completely back to normal.

Why is Aquaman playing second base and batting last? He’s not the best on land but he tries really hard.

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(Courtesy Pinterest.com)

The first base coach is The Atom because he can shrink himself and others. Can you imagine how helpful that would be when stealing bases? No one would see them coming. Black Canary is the third base coach. She has a canary cry which could render opponents defenseless but she prefers not using it if she can just be a regular coach.

The umpires are pretty self explanatory. Lex Luthor is relatively calm and judgmental while the Joker would race around the field to make calls and probably try to distract the players in the process. As we all know, he tends to stir up chaos in any way he can.

raw

(Courtesy tenor.com)

That’s just my take on the Justice League playing baseball. Maybe we’ll see it in the upcoming Justice League movie or maybe it’ll just stay on the small screen?

Catching Up With Catcher Donny Sands

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The season was winding down for the Pulaski Yankees, the rookie affiliate of the New York Yankees, as the team faced the Burlington Royals in the last home series. Catcher Donny Sands quickly looked up into the stands as he approached the batter’s box. Smiling back proudly was his mom Alma who knew just what it took for him to make his dream come true.

Sands started playing baseball when he was three years old and it quickly became a passion for the whole family. His dad Roger played college baseball and his mom was extremely supportive becoming Donny’s drill partner.

“When I was little, she would actually throw me pinto beans and I would try to hit them with a broomstick. We were pretty poor so we used whatever we could find,” Sands said. “She would also throw me these little balls from Mexico and would also roll them to me to focus on fielding. She did anything she could to help me out.”

The Sands continued to help Donny pursue his dream as he played travel ball throughout the southwest.

“I played on this team called 520 Elite,” Sands said. “I’m from Tucson, Arizona and that was the area code. We played in Phoenix, California, and Las Vegas.”

When Sands was in high school, his father passed away. Sands said it made him and his mom closer as they overcame many obstacles to keep the baseball dream alive.

“All we have is each other and she’s my best friend,” Sands said. “High school was hard. My mom would have to go to Mexico to work and I would live in my car. We got kicked out of a few houses and went wherever we could.”

It was at one of those houses where Sands found out all of their hard work had paid off.

“There was a news station in Arizona doing a story on me. They were doing a day in the life kind of thing,” Sands said. “I had done a pre-draft workout with the Yankees and the reporters kept asking me what I thought. The Yankees called me in the eighth round.”

Sands was excited and decided to break the news to his mom who was working at the time and didn’t know.

“I actually came to her work with the cameras following me. I told her and she didn’t even notice the cameras. She just started crying because she was so happy.”

The Yankees drafted Sands in the eighth round of the 2015 draft and his signing bonus allowed him to give back to his mom.

“I bought my mom a house. That was a big thing for us because we didn’t have one when I was in high school. Now I know my mom has a place that she can call her own.”

Sands mainly played shortstop and third base in high school but the Yankees decided to convert him into a catcher just like Pulaski teammate Manny Argomaniz.

“It’s been awesome because everybody in this organization has been here for us. It’s been a lot of fun but it’s definitely hard,” Sands said. “People like to say it’s easy but it’s been really hard especially learning a new position behind the plate. I learn something new every day and am progressing. I think the hard work will definitely be worth it.”

The Sands family has overcome many hurdles and put in long hours of hard work to make it to pro baseball and Donny said with his family’s support, he hopes to continue making them proud.

“My mom is my best friend. She has helped me a lot whether it’s traveling places for baseball or helping me with drills. We’re constantly talking. I know she’s excited and happy for me and I hope to go as far as I can for her.”

Drillers Down Naturals 5-1

It was my first time visiting Arvest Ballpark tonight, which is the home of the Northwest Arkansas Naturals, the Double-A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals. The ballpark is absolutely beautiful with really cool sails on the top of the stadium and on this beautiful night, the home team was defeated with the only run coming from a solo home run from Ryan O’Hearn. However, the Naturals are still in the playoff hunt so stay tuned to see if they make a post-season run.

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Chris Swauger Transitions From Player To Coach

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(Photo by Jarah Wright)

If you’ve been to any Johnson City Cardinals game this season, chances are you’ve seen manager Chris Swauger in action. It’s his third season as coach and second season as the manager of the rookie league club. The Cardinals lifer has had anything but an ordinary journey through the minors. If you ask him, professional baseball seemed out of reach after college.

“I was at home and had quit listening to the draft because I just assumed it wasn’t going to happen. I just happened to be passing through the office. We had left the draft on but weren’t really listening,” Swauger said. “I peeked in and saw my name pop up on the screen and was like hey, that’s me. I was like oh wow. That really just happened. I ran outside where my parents were by the pool screaming I got drafted. They asked who. I said the Cardinals and my mom was like okay, they’re alright.”

Swauger grew up around the Tampa area and said the family was always Rays and Yankees fans but he was excited for the opportunity to continue his baseball career.

“I was happy to be drafted even though all the scouts that I had talked to had said I’d go higher. I now know how the system works and stuff like that but it was great experience. It was very fortuitous that I walked through when I did to hear my name get called.”

The lefty utility player mainly played in the outfield as he worked his way through the Cardinals system.

“Unfortunately I didn’t play at Johnson City. I started with our Penn League affiliate because of more my age than skill level and basically hit every stop along the way,” Swauger said. “I’ve enjoyed everything from the way we do things, the way we approach the game, the way we play. Coming from a military school, the way we pay attention to details and take care of little things appealed to me and helped me in my career.”

One of those stops included a Texas League Championship with the Double-A Springfield Cardinals in 2012.

“Our Triple-A manager Mike Shildt was the manager of that team and every time I joke with him that he wasn’t a very good manager because the entire lineup one through nine made it to the big leagues except me and he batted me fifth,” Swauger said laughing. “But that was a lot of fun. It was a great team not only talent-wise but also because of the people. The Cardinals not only make good ballplayers but also create good quality human beings and I think there were a lot on that team.”

And the Cardinals saw something in Swauger that would allow him to stay in pro baseball even after his playing career was done. However, Swauger wasn’t ready to stop his major league run just yet.

“Coaching was brought to my attention during spring training in 2014. I had just come off of an All-Star year in Double-A and to be quite honest, I just wasn’t ready to do it and still thought I had stuff left in the tank as a player,” Swauger said. “The Cardinals were gracious enough to let me keep playing through to see if any spots opened up.”

When no spots opened up, Swauger decided to ask for his release for the shot to keep playing elsewhere but things didn’t go according to plan.

“I kind of floated out there in no man’s land for about three weeks before the Phillies called me and I was awful,” Swauger said. “I was a terrible player for about two weeks before they released me. But it was a good thing because it helped me to get over myself with that mentality that I was still a player who could make it to the big leagues. I don’t think if I had accepted coaching when they originally asked me that I would have been a very good one because I would still be focusing on me and not the guys I would be coaching.”

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(Photo by Jarah Wright)

Swauger then accepted a position to be the hitting coach for Johnson City in 2014 before becoming the manager in 2015. Since then, Swauger said he has focused on learning as much as he can and imparting wisdom that players can carry with them throughout the minors.

“A lot of our job, all the coaches but mine especially, is to kind of observe. You give them things they will use throughout the Cardinals organization like the fundamentals but at the same time I’ll try to figure out what each individual guy does well and find their weaknesses,” Swauger said. “The biggest thing is to establish a relationship with them, find some common ground, and try to get them to trust you. As you go along, help them as much as you can. A lot of times I stay out of the way and encourage them to be themselves and to do what got them here.”

And while the team has found success in 2016, Swauger said there are still things he wants to improve on as a coach.

“I would definitely say throwing batting practice. I get a little wild every now and then. I get way too many guys thrown out at the plate but that’s okay. That will come with experience,” Swauger said. “The biggest challenge for me as an outfielder is knowing how to position infielders and managing pitchers because I’ve never really had to pay attention before. I would be in the outfield seeing who’s coming in. I never really had to think about why they’re coming in or potential situations and matchups or think three innings ahead. It’s not something I’m awful at but it’s always a challenge to work through these types of things.”

Another challenge is seeing the big picture of the game instead of focusing on your position.

“Seeing the game is tough because when you’re a player, you really only see it with tunnel vision. But when you’re a manager, you have this broad spectrum and you’re always paranoid you’re going to miss something. I do all the time.”

But with another season winding down, Swauger said there’s no place he’d rather be than in the Cardinals organization that gave him his shot on draft day.

“It’s a great honor and it obviously shows a lot of faith on their part. I work as hard as I can to reward that faith,” Swauger said. “They give me great feedback and I learn so much from the staff around me and the staff above me. They guide me and I appreciate how much they’ve helped me.”

And when asked about moving up, he just smiled.

“I guess I’m the youngest manager but it’s by like a month. The guy that’s a month older is like three levels ahead of me so maybe I’m not as advanced. But if I keep working hard, maybe one day I’ll get there.”